Rare Hematology News

Disease Profile

Babesiosis

Prevalence
Prevalence estimates on Rare Medical Network websites are calculated based on data available from numerous sources, including US and European government statistics, the NIH, Orphanet, and published epidemiologic studies. Rare disease population data is recognized to be highly variable, and based on a wide variety of source data and methodologies, so the prevalence data on this site should be assumed to be estimated and cannot be considered to be absolutely correct.
<1 / 1 000 000

< 331

US Estimated

< 514

Europe Estimated

Age of onset

All ages

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ICD-10

B60.0

Inheritance

Autosomal dominant A pathogenic variant in only one gene copy in each cell is sufficient to cause an autosomal dominant disease

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Autosomal recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of each gene of the chromosome are needed to cause an autosomal recessive disease and observe the mutant phenotype

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X-linked
dominant X-linked dominant inheritance, sometimes referred to as X-linked dominance, is a mode of genetic inheritance by which a dominant gene is carried on the X chromosome.

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X-linked
recessive Pathogenic variants in both copies of a gene on the X chromosome cause an X-linked recessive disorder

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Mitochondrial or multigenic Mitochondrial genetic disorders can be caused by changes (mutations) in either the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that lead to dysfunction of the mitochondria and inadequate production of energy.

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Multigenic or multifactor Inheritance involving many factors, of which at least one is genetic but none is of overwhelming importance, as in the causation of a disease by multiple genetic and environmental factors.

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Not applicable

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Other names (AKA)

Babesia parasite infection; Human babesiosis

Categories

Parasitic diseases

Summary

Babesiosis refers to a condition caused by microscopic parasites that infect the red blood cells. Many people who are infected with Babesia parasites do not experience any symptoms of the condition. When present, signs and symptoms may include flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, body aches, nausea and fatigue. In severe cases, babesiosis can be associated with hemolytic anemia. Babesia parasites are primarily spread by infected ticks. Treatment is generally only required in people who develop symptoms of the condition. When necessary, affected people are often prescribed a combination of antimicrobial medications along with supportive care to manage symptoms.[1][2][3]

Symptoms

This table lists symptoms that people with this disease may have. For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed. This information comes from a database called the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) . The HPO collects information on symptoms that have been described in medical resources. The HPO is updated regularly. Use the HPO ID to access more in-depth information about a symptom.

Medical Terms Other Names
Learn More:
HPO ID
80%-99% of people have these symptoms
Fever
0001945
Headache
Headaches
0002315
Hemolytic anemia
0001878
30%-79% of people have these symptoms
Arthralgia
Joint pain
0002829
Cough
Coughing
0012735
Fatigue
Tired
Tiredness

[ more ]

0012378
Hepatomegaly
Enlarged liver
0002240
Hyperhidrosis
Excessive sweating
Increased sweating
Profuse sweating
Sweating
Sweating profusely
Sweating, increased

[ more ]

0000975
Jaundice
Yellow skin
Yellowing of the skin

[ more ]

0000952
Leukopenia
Decreased blood leukocyte number
Low white blood cell count

[ more ]

0001882
Myalgia
Muscle ache
Muscle pain

[ more ]

0003326
Splenomegaly
Increased spleen size
0001744
Thrombocytopenia
Low platelet count
0001873
5%-29% of people have these symptoms
Anorexia
0002039
Clinodactyly of the 5th toe
0001864
Coma
0001259
Confusion
Disorientation
Easily confused
Mental disorientation

[ more ]

0001289
Congestive heart failure
Cardiac failure
Cardiac failures
Heart failure

[ more ]

0001635
Depressivity
Depression
0000716
Disseminated intravascular coagulation
0005521
Hepatic failure
Liver failure
0001399
Hypercoagulability
0100724
Limitation of joint mobility
Decreased joint mobility
Decreased mobility of joints
Limited joint mobility
Limited joint motion

[ more ]

0001376
Myocardial infarction
Heart attack
0001658
Nausea and vomiting
0002017
Photophobia
Extreme sensitivity of the eyes to light
Light hypersensitivity

[ more ]

0000613
Recurrent pharyngitis
Recurrent sore throat
0100776
Renal insufficiency
Renal failure
Renal failure in adulthood

[ more ]

0000083
Respiratory insufficiency
Respiratory impairment
0002093
Venous thrombosis
Blood clot in vein
0004936

Organizations

Support and advocacy groups can help you connect with other patients and families, and they can provide valuable services. Many develop patient-centered information and are the driving force behind research for better treatments and possible cures. They can direct you to research, resources, and services. Many organizations also have experts who serve as medical advisors or provide lists of doctors/clinics. Visit the group’s website or contact them to learn about the services they offer. Inclusion on this list is not an endorsement by GARD.

Social Networking Websites

Learn more

These resources provide more information about this condition or associated symptoms. The in-depth resources contain medical and scientific language that may be hard to understand. You may want to review these resources with a medical professional.

Where to Start

  • You can obtain information on this topic from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC is recognized as the lead federal agency for developing and applying disease prevention and control, environmental health, and health promotion and education activities designed to improve the health of the people of the United States.

In-Depth Information

  • Medscape Reference provides information on this topic. You may need to register to view the medical textbook, but registration is free.
  • The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers. Monarch’s tools are designed to make it easier to compare the signs and symptoms (phenotypes) of different diseases and discover common features. This initiative is a collaboration between several academic institutions across the world and is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Visit the website to explore the biology of this condition.
  • Orphanet is a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and orphan drugs. Access to this database is free of charge.
  • PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Babesiosis. Click on the link to view a sample search on this topic.

References

  1. Burke A Cunha, MD. Babesiosis. Medscape Reference. May 2017; https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/212605-overview.
  2. Jeffrey A Gelfand, MD, FACP, Edouard G Vannier, PhD. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of babesiosis. UpToDate. June 2017; Accessed 7/23/2017.
  3. Parasites Babesiosis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. July 2012; https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/babesiosis/.